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RESOURCES

  1. Mississippi Genealogy & History Network – MSGHN.ORG
  2. City Of Meadville – CITYOFMEADVILLE.COM
  3. Ancestry – ANCESTRY.COM

ABOUT

This blog Mysteries Of My Ancestors is Dedicated to My Grandmother Mrs. Hazel Williams Oliver and her family.

Mom

My name is Lanita Oliver, I have always been interested in learning about my family history. I started my journey sometime in the year 2000 to learn about my family, and to do all that I can do to preserve our history for future generations as well as inspire generations before and after me to invest in the stories of their ancestors!

During my journey, I came across some missing bits and pieces which had me at a standstill so I decided to take a break in 2008. During this time my, Ancestors were calling me to continue the work that was put in front of me. Despite some of the challenges I have faced researching my Ancestors in the past, I decided in Aug of 2012 to regroup and continue my journey to find the “Mysteries Of My Ancestors”. I’m certain there will be many road blocks in the future, but there will also be much progress in obtaining information. I am hopeful to learn more about the “Mysteries Of My Ancestors” and open the book to “The Adventures Of My Ancestors”.

HAZEL WILLIAMS FAMILY HISTORY

Hazel’s family history begins with her paternal grandparents Rev. Miles and Beatrice Bryant Williams to this union three children were born. They were Robertia, Frank and Mary Joyce Williams. The maternal grandparents were Wesley Williams and Florence Monroe and to this union one child was born named Minnie Irver Williams. Florence Monroe then married James (Jim) Moore who then adopted her daughter Minnie Irver Williams, also to this union three children were born. They were Minnie Estelle, Curley Pearl and Frances Byrd Moore.

 With the joining of Frank Williams and Minnie Moore Williams, they were blessed with eight children that they loved dearly. Frank and Minnie taught them the ways of a spiritual, mental, physical and educational life. The children are as follow Velmos, Florence, Hazel (my grandmother), Frank Jr., Napoleon, Irva, Georgia B and James. In addition to their own children, this couple reared two grandchildren as their own. Which were Wesley Williams and Leneverett Tabb.

 Frank and Minnie were both a member of St. Mary #1 MB Church until death. Frank was a well respected and reputable farmer. Also, he was a member of the trustee board where he served for a number of years. Minnie was a homemaker and was very active in the community and church affairs. She served as president of the usher board for 44 years.

 In essence, Frank and Minnie Williams left a beautiful number of grandchildren, great grandchildren, great great grandchildren, sons-in-laws and daughter-in-laws to be honorned as being a part of the Williams and Moore families. God Bless You All.

Florence Monroe

Florence Monroe was born about 1890 in Mississippi. On the April 15, 1910 US Federal Census Florence Monroe was 20 years of age in the household with her grandmother Martha Cameron in Franklin Co, Mississippi. On June 30, 1910 Florence had a daughter with Wesley Williams (b) abt 1883 in MS named Minnie Irva Williams my Great Grandmother in Meadville, Franklin Co, Mississippi. Sometime after Minnie was born she and her parents moved to McGehee, Desha Co, Arkansas. Not sure as to when Florence and Wesley went there separate ways, Florence later married James (Jim) Moore and they had three children together named Curley Pearl, Minnie Estell, and Frances Byrd along with adopting a daughter by the name of Gracie Mae between the years of 1913 and 1926. In 1920 at the age of 30 Florence Moore lived in Hardy, Lee Co, Arkansas with her husband James, 2 step-sons, and 4 daughters. Then in 1930 Florence was 39 years old and lived in Lake View, Phillips Co, Arkansas with her husband, Jim, and 4 daughters. On April 1, 1940 Florence Moore was 50 years old and lived in St Francis, Arkansas with her husband, Jim, and 2 daughters. She died in 1964 at her home on Franklin Street in Helena, Phillips, Arkansas, at the age of 73.

Minnie Moore

Minnie Moore Williams

Minnie I. Moore was born on June 30, 1910, in Meadville, Mississippi, the only child of Wesley Williams and Florence Monroe. Minnie married Frank D. Williams on December 25, 1927, in Phillips County Arkansas. They had nine children Velmos, Florence, Hazel, Frank Jr, Napoleon, Irva, Beatrice, Georgia B and James in 20 years. In 1920, Minnie I. Williams was 10 years old and lived in Hardy, Arkansas with her step-father, mother, 2 step-brothers, and 3 sisters. In 1930, Minnie Williams was 20 years old and lived in Lake View, Arkansas with her husband, Frank Williams Sr, and son Velmos. On April 1, 1940, Minnie Williams was 29 years old and lived in Lake City, Arkansas with her husband, Frank, 3 sons Velmos, Frank Jr, and Napoleon, and 2 daughters Florence and Hazel. She died on February 2, 1982, at home in Helena, Arkansas at the age of 71.

Maternal:

1.      Cameron (MS)

2.      Monroe (MS)

2.      Moore (LA, MS, AR)

3.      Williams (LA, MS, AR)

Paternal:

1.       Boston (GA, MS)

2.       Bryant (MS)

3.       Magsby (MS)

4.       Owens (MS)

5.       Perry (MS)

6.       Roberson (AL, MS)

7.       Williams (MS, AR)

8.       Wilson (MS, AR)

COUNTIES

COUNTIES WHERE FAMILY MEMBERS LIVED

 

  • HISTORY OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

Franklin County was the fourth county formed in Mississippi, so is one of the oldest of the counties in Mississippi. It was established December 21, 1809, eleven years after the Mississippi Territory was formed. The territorial Governor at the time was David Holmes, who was appointed by President Thomas Jefferson.

The County was named after Benjamin Franklin, noted diplomat, statesman, and inventor. The original act of the General Assembly states that the part of Adams county included within the following boundaries shall be known as of Franklin County and reads as follows:

“Beginning at the point where the basis-meridian line intersects the river Homochitto, and pursuing the said meridian line until it intersects the line dividing the counties of Adams and Jefferson, thence pursuing the last mentioned line to the western boundary of Washington County, thence pursuing the last mentioned line until it intersects the northern boundary of Amite County, thence along the said last mentioned boundary line to the point where it intersects the said river Homochitto, and thence Pursuing the meanders of said river to the beginning.”

The centrally located county seat is the town of Meadville was originally named Franklin and was located two miles west of its current location. In 1809 a citizens committee made up of Richard Coleman, Stephen Middleton, John Spivars, Dougal McLaughlin, and Samuel Ratcliff, was formed to acquire land for a county seat.

The county seat was moved to the new town of Meadville in 1920. The town was, named for Cowles Mead, who served as the second secretary of the Mississippi Territory. Meadville was incorporated as a Mississippi town in 1860. Mississippi Congressman Dan C. McGeehee was a native of Meadville.

The county has a total area of 566.74 square miles, of which 564.60 square miles is land and 2.14 square mile (0.38%) is water. The population recorded in the 1810 Federal Census was 2,016. The 2010 census recorded 8,118 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Jefferson County (north), Lincoln County (east), Amite County (south), Wilkinson County (southwest), and Adams County (west). Communities in the county include Bude, Meadville, Roxie, Eddiceton, Hamburg, Knoxville, Lucien, McCall Creek, and Quentin.

 

  • HISTORY OF COAHOMA COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

Coahoma County was established February 09, 1836, and is located in the northwestern part of the state in the fertile Yazoo Delta region. The county was an original county of the Choctaw Cession of 1830. The name “Coahoma” is a Choctaw word meaning “red panther.” The act creating the county defined its limits as follows:

“Beginning at the point where the line between townships 24 and 25 of the surveys of the late Choctaw cession intersects the Mississippi River, and running thence up the said river to the point where the dividing line between the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes of Indians intersects the same; thence with the dividing line to the point where the line between ranges two and three of the survey of the said Choctaw cession intersects the same; thence with said range line, to the line between townships 24 and 25 aforesaid, and thence with the said township line to the beginning.”

 Port Royal was once the county seat of Coahoma County. It was a rival of Friars Point, five miles up the Mississippi River. In the early days the county seats of the Mississippi River counties were always located on the banks of that stream. When Port Royal was cut off from the river in 1848, its fate was sealed and the county seat of justice was located at Friars Point, which still remained a river town. The latter place had a population of about 1,000 (census of 1920), and received its name in honor of Robert Friar, one of its earliest settlers. Clarksdale, one of the county seats, is now the largest and most important city in the county, and had a population of 7,500 in 1920. Clarksdale was named for John Clark, a brother-in-law of Governor James L. Alcorn, whose home, Eagle’s Nest, was in this county.

The county has a total area of 583.14 square miles, of which 554.15 square miles is land and 28.99 square mile (4.97%) is water. The population recorded in the 1840 Federal Census was 1,290. The 2010 census recorded 26,151 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Tunica County (north), Quitman County (east), Tallahatchie County (southeast), Bolivar County (southwest), and Phillips County, Arkansas (west). Communities in the county include Clarksdale, Coahoma, Friars Point, Jonestown, Lula, Lyon, Bobo, Claremont, Clover Hill, Dublin, Farrell, Hillhouse, Lu-Rand, Mattson, Moon Lake (community), Rena Lara, Rich, Roundaway, Rudyard, Sherard, and Stovall.

CITIES

CITIES WHERE FAMILY MEMBERS LIVED

 

  •  HISTORY OF MEADVILLE, MISSISSIPPI

The city of Meadville was named for Cowles Meade, Virginia native, who was appointed Secretary of the Territory in 1805. He had also served as acting Governor and Speaker of the House. Meadville was the political hotbed of Franklin County. Most of the leading political figures of the county lived in Meadville, or in its’ environs. In 1860, it had telegraph service, three inns and taverns, two houses of private entertainment, a post office, cobblers, several school teachers, a group of lawyers, a number of mechanics, several blacksmiths, and a tailor.

A gentleman passing through Meadville in 1841, describe it as “Being in a state of dilapidation and decline. The palsying hand of time had shaken it to pieces.” Actually, the whole county was suffering from the lingering depression that is usually styled “the panic of 1837.” The traveler was undoubtedly sincere in his observation concerning the condition of Meadville. No one had enough money to buy a tavern license in the town that year, so he might have missed his mid-day “dram.” It might have appeared dilapidated, because the Whig Party had consistently led his Democratic Party during the past few years or because many people had left the county two jumps ahead of process servers, to escape paying their debts and had left their homes vacant and fields unattended. The county did not have a sheriff because William K. Ratcliff, the man elected sheriff, could not get any person or group of persons as sureties for his bond, and the old jail had nearly fallen down.

Conditions in the entire state were bad. Various laws were passed, restricting sheriffs who were busily selling debtors’ property. The sheriff received half of the property at auction, if there were no bidders, and some sheriff’s “forgot” to advertise the auctions. Early in 1841, a law was passed requiring the sheriff to post five notices, one being on the courthouse, advertising the auctions which could not be held without ten days’ notice on personal property, or thirty days’ notice on real estate. Later in the year, a law was passed to ban the sheriff from receiving half of the property where there were no bidders.

About six months after the traveler came through Meadville, William Proby, Oscar J.A. Stuart and John Johnson put glasses in all the windows, repaired the broken benches and steps, made a new door for the east side of the courthouse, and made other needed repairs upon the building. About that same time, Patrick Burd, a former overseer for Robert Anderson, began to build a new jail, because in 1839, Edmund Tucker, the sheriff, had carried prisoners to the Adams County Jail due to the insufficiency of the county jail. The new jail was to be 30 feet long and 25 feet wide from out to out and two stones high, with two dungeons – one on the ground floor and the other on the second. A sheriff’s office was to be on the lower story, and a debtor’s room on the second. The sheriff’s office and the debtor’s department each were to have a fireplace sealed to the building by iron or wooden timbers. Each story was to be nine feet in the clear and the windows of the upper and lower dungeons were to be lined with an iron plate, three-eighths of an inch in thickness and eleven inches wide, to extend six inches above and below. The windows were to be spiked well to the sheds and riveted through, with three bars in each window. The lower windows were to be bricked up half way from the bottom, half the thickness of the walls. Later, a rail fence with four gates was built around the public square. The posts were white oak and the fence extended 66 feet north.

In the years following the depression, life in Meadville returned to normal. Taverns and inns were again opened in the town. Before the panic, the taverns were operated by Reddin Byrd; the jailer, N.R. McKay; John D. Warschow; and Lewis Hollinger, who were predominantly of old established families. After the depression, taverns and inns were operated by persons, who had in many cases, recently arrived from abroad. Tavern keepers George Garvis and Henry N. McKenzie came from Great Britain. Ebenezer Eleeker, who ran a small store in Meadville, was a native of England. Jose Rodriquez, another merchant, came from Cuba. Lewis M. Hollinger, who had the largest tavern in town, Hiram Mann and Jacob Stern, tavern keepers, were born in Germany.

Men of foreign ancestry, comprised a large segment of the population of the town in 1860. Charles Brewerton, a local painter, was a native of England; Joseph Glick and Marcius Lilverburg, both tailors, were born in Germany; and Edward Moreau, a cobbler, was a recent immigrant from Russia. Thomas Ryan, a brick mason, hailed from the Emeral Isle, and Henry Hinelcamp, a mechanic, and Barnett Broadmitz, a clerk, were both born in Europe. Sigmund Mann, who operated a general store in Meadville, was of German origin, John and James Garvis, brothers of George Garvis, were originally from Great Britain.

In the various professions and crafts, there were many Native Americans, some of whom were born in Franklin County. George W. Imes and Rufus R. Ford were engineers. Dewitt G. Graham practiced law and was a competent surveyor. Thomas M. Pickett was a carpenter. F.C. Huff, John F. Hall, William D. Buckles, and Alexander McDonally were mechanics. William K. Brown was a shoemaker. Some of the doctors who resided in Meadville were John B. Holden, John J. Jones, James A. Lee, Orvin V. Shurtliff, and Jacob R. Sample. In addition to lawyer-surveyor D. C. Graham, other attorneys were David A. Herring, William S. Cassedy, and Judge Hiram Cassedy. John A. Sample was the town’s sole artist.

John M. Flowers and Joseph B. Wilkinson operated houses of private entertainment in Meadville in 1860. Wilkinson also had a grocery store and was in charge of mail delivery. Some sources state that he became postmaster in Meadville, in May, 1858, upon the death of John P. Stewart, who had been postmaster prior to that time. Wilkinson had eight men working for him, who distributed the mail throughout the county. Several new buildings were built in the decade prior to 1860. The Masons were not satisfied with the old Masonic Lodge. In 1857, they bought two lots from William O. Weathersby and John P. Stewart, and Stewart and John A. Hunter contracted to build a new lodge hall. The old building was sold to Richard Haley by O.V. Shurtliff, one of the commissioners for the Masonic finance committee.

The various transactions in land in Meadville indicate that Seaborn E. Jones bought several lots in Meadville, and on this land he probably built his tavern. In this period, other purchasers of Meadville land were: David Laurie; J.P. Stewart, a lawyer; William Calvit; William S. Cassedy, a lawyer; Jesse W. Cobb, a tavern keeper; Erwin Cleary, and John L. Bornmore. Pickett Reynolds had begun what was to be the largest saloon in Meadville in 1860. This tavern was a two story structure about one hundred feet long and sixty feet wide. Reynolds planned to convert the lower story into a tavern and the upper story into small rooms for sleeping accommodations.

AncestryDNA Results

West Africa                86%

Scandinavian             7%

Uncertain                   7%

Screenshot_2013-11-03-11-40-49 Screenshot_2013-11-03-11-44-48 Screenshot_2013-11-03-11-46-38

REGION APPROXIMATE AMOUNT

Africa 92%

Ivory Coast/Ghana 28%

Cameroon/Congo 20%

Benin/Togo 14%

Nigeria 11%

Mali 9%

Africa Southeastern Bantu 7%

•           Trace Regions 3%

Senegal 2%

Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers 1%

•           Other Regions Tested

Africa North 0%

America 0%

•           Other Regions Tested

Native American 0%

Asia 0%

•           Other Regions Tested

Asia East 0%

Asia Central 0%

Asia South 0%

Europe 7%

•           Trace Regions 7%

Finnish/Northern Russia 3%

Ireland 2%

Scandinavia < 1%

Europe West < 1%

•           Other Regions Tested

Great Britain 0%

European Jewish 0%

Europe East 0%

Italy/Greece 0%

Iberian Peninsula 0%

Pacific Islander < 1%

•           Trace Regions < 1%

Polynesia < 1%

•           Other Regions Tested

Melanesia 0%

West Asia 0%

•           Other Regions Tested

Caucasus 0%

ChartImg

Continent (Subcontinent) Population Percentage Margin of Error
Europe Finnish, Orcadian, Russian 11.05% ±0.08%
Africa (West African) Yoruba 88.95% ±0.08%

Screenshot_2013-11-22-23-48-48-1

  • GEDmatch: Uploaded Results from Ancestry

Africa9 Admixture Proportions

Africa9 Admixture Proportions

Population
Europe 7.40%
NW_Africa 4.63%
SW_Asia 0.37%
E_Africa 3.76%
S_Africa 11.69%
Mbuti 2.19%
W_Africa 57.35%
Biaka 9.60%
San 3.01%

Africa9 Oracle

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 W_Africa 57.35
2 S_Africa 11.69
3 Biaka 9.6
4 Europe 7.4
5 NW_Africa 4.63
6 E_Africa 3.76
7 San 3.01
8 Mbuti 2.19
9 SW_Asia 0.37

Single Population Sharing: Calculation 1

# Population (source) Distance
1 Fang 12
2 Kongo 12.84
3 Bamoun 13.26
4 Kaba 18.36
5 Hausa 19.19
6 Igbo 20.08
7 Yoruba 21.47
8 Luhya 22.47
9 Brong 23.83
10 Bantu_N.E. 25.17
11 Mada 25.66
12 Mandenka 29.46
13 Fulani 31.35
14 Bulala 40.78
15 Morocco_S 59.45
16 Maasai 61.53
17 Algeria 66.52
18 Xhosa 67.86
19 Libya 68.32
20 Moroccans 68.61

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 88.8% Bamoun + 11.2% North_Italian @ 6.31
2 85.5% Bamoun + 14.5% North_African (Dodecad) @ 6.35
3 88.8% Bamoun + 11.2% Tuscan @ 6.63
4 87.6% Bamoun + 12.4% Morocco_Jews @ 6.74
5 90.8% Bamoun + 9.2% French_Basque @ 6.77
6 86.6% Bamoun + 13.4% Morocco_N @ 6.83
7 89.6% Kongo + 10.4% North_Italian @ 7.02
8 85.5% Bamoun + 14.5% Algeria @ 7.08
9 91.3% Kongo + 8.7% French_Basque @ 7.1
10 89.6% Kongo + 10.4% Tuscan @ 7.33
11 88.1% Bamoun + 11.9% North_African_Jews (Dodecad) @ 7.46
12 86.8% Kongo + 13.2% North_African (Dodecad) @ 7.55
13 88.6% Kongo + 11.4% Morocco_Jews @ 7.63
14 92.4% Fang + 7.6% French_Basque @ 7.67
15 91.1% Fang + 8.9% North_Italian @ 7.86
16 87.9% Kongo + 12.1% Morocco_N @ 7.91
17 86.8% Kongo + 13.2% Algeria @ 8.03
18 91.1% Fang + 8.9% Tuscan @ 8.11
19 86.7% Bamoun + 13.3% Moroccans @ 8.15
20 89.2% Kongo + 10.8% North_African_Jews (Dodecad) @ 8.26

Single Population Sharing: Calculation 2

# Population (source) Distance
1 Fang 12
2 Kongo 12.84
3 Bamoun 13.26
4 Kaba 18.36
5 Hausa 19.19
6 Igbo 20.08
7 Yoruba 21.47
8 Luhya 22.47
9 Brong 23.83
10 Bantu_N.E. 25.17
11 Mada 25.66
12 Mandenka 29.46
13 Fulani 31.35
14 Bulala 40.78
15 Morocco_S 59.45
16 Maasai 61.53
17 Algeria 66.52
18 Xhosa 67.86
19 Libya 68.32
20 Moroccans 68.61

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 88.8% Bamoun + 11.2% North_Italian @ 6.31
2 85.5% Bamoun + 14.5% North_African (Dodecad) @ 6.35
3 88.8% Bamoun + 11.2% Tuscan @ 6.63
4 87.6% Bamoun + 12.4% Morocco_Jews @ 6.74
5 90.8% Bamoun + 9.2% French_Basque @ 6.77
6 86.6% Bamoun + 13.4% Morocco_N @ 6.83
7 89.6% Kongo + 10.4% North_Italian @ 7.02
8 85.5% Bamoun + 14.5% Algeria @ 7.08
9 91.3% Kongo + 8.7% French_Basque @ 7.1
10 89.6% Kongo + 10.4% Tuscan @ 7.33
11 88.1% Bamoun + 11.9% North_African_Jews (Dodecad) @ 7.46
12 86.8% Kongo + 13.2% North_African (Dodecad) @ 7.55
13 88.6% Kongo + 11.4% Morocco_Jews @ 7.63
14 92.4% Fang + 7.6% French_Basque @ 7.67
15 91.1% Fang + 8.9% North_Italian @ 7.86
16 87.9% Kongo + 12.1% Morocco_N @ 7.91
17 86.8% Kongo + 13.2% Algeria @ 8.03
18 91.1% Fang + 8.9% Tuscan @ 8.11
19 86.7% Bamoun + 13.3% Moroccans @ 8.15
20 89.2% Kongo + 10.8% North_African_Jews (Dodecad) @ 8.26

2014 Spring Ancestor Challege

Spring Ancestor 2014 Badge

I am a member of the African-American Genealogy and Slave Ancestry Research (AAGSAR).  The members of this group will be working on solving at least one ancestor challenge by Spring 2014.  So the next few months of writing will be about my journey of finding the parents of my 2nd Great Grandmother Florence Monroe.

To find the parents of Florence Monroe my maternal 2nd Great Grandmother.

Challenge:  Finding  the Parents of Florence Monroe my maternal 2nd Great Grandmother.

Goal: Discover the names and locations of where her parents were born.

Ancestor:   Florence Monroe

Other(s): Wesley Williams and James (Jim) Moore

Tribe(s): 

  1. Mississippi: Franklin County
  2. Arkansas: Desha, Monroe and Phillips County

Years: 1890-1964/1965

Summary: According to information I received from my grandmother Hazel Williams Oliver before she passed that her grandmother Florence Monroe was Cherokee Indian. This information was also told by other elder family members. Florence (b) abt 1890 had a daughter with Wesley Williams (b) abt 1883 in MS named Minnie Irva Williams my Great Grandmother (b) June 30, 1910 in Meadville, Franklin Co, MS. Sometime after Minnie was born Wesley was accused of killing a man and left Meadville and moved to McGehee, Desha Co, AR. Not soon after Wesley leaving he sent for Florence and Minnie. Not sure as to when Florence and Wesley went separete ways. Wesley married Mamie who is full blooded Cherokee Indian and had children then moved to Kansas City, MO. Florence later married James (Jim) Moore (b) abt 1878 and moved to Helena, Phillips Co, AR. Florence and James (Jim) had children Minnie Estell, Frances Byrd, and Curley Pearl.

Questions:

  1. Who are Florence parents?
  2. When and Where did her parents die?
  3. Did Florence marry Wesley Williams and if so when and where.
  4. When and Where did Florence marry James (Jim) Moore?
  5. When and Where did Florence die?
  6. When and Where did James(Jim) Moore die.
  7. When did Wesley move to Kansas City, MO?
  8. When did Wesley marry Mamie?
  9. When did Wesley die?

Resources:

1910 US Federal Census

1910UnitedStatesFederalCensusForFlorenceMonroe

1920 US Federal Census

1920UnitedStatesFederalCensusForFlorenceMoore

1940 US Federal Census

1940UnitedStatesFederalCensusForFlorenceMoore

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